The Blue, the Grey, and a Newbie’s Search for Wild, Edible Greens

How’s it going out there? It’s hot here! 95 degrees and humid. What did I decide to do on such a day? I went hiking at the Bull Run Park in Manassas. This is where the first and second battle of Manassas took place.

The first battle took place in July of 1861. HOW those men fought a battle in the dead heat of July in Virginia, in those heavy woolen uniforms, with about 80 to 100 pounds worth of gear on their backs, running full tilt at one another on a HILL, with a loaded firearm and cannons blowing craters and taking limbs left and right, I will never know! I was dying in running shorts and a tank top, and I had a Camel Back filled with water. It barely weighs 15 pounds. There is no cover on Matthews Hill either; hardly a tree over the entire battleground. You feel the heat from above and below.

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It’s very beautiful and peaceful now (except for the sounds of traffic). But being on that hill gives you some perspective on what it was like the day of the battle. There must have been an “Oh, S*#t!” moment as the Confederate and the Federal troops eyed each other from across the field. There were brothers on the left, and brothers on the right, and not everyone was going to be walking off that hill when it was all done.

I’m a New Englander, born and raised. One of my ancestors fought in an infantry division from New Jersey during the Civil War. But I suspect that we had relatives on both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line. In Clifton, there is a sign posted outside one of the houses on the main strip, claiming that a Payne (my mother’s maiden name) was a housebuilder in the area, and was a lumber broker to the railroad that now runs through the town. My great-grandfather was a railroad worker. Family business? Possibly. I don’t have any formal proof at the moment.

The man on the left is my great-grandfather, George W. Payne. The sign is from Clifton.

In any case, while my roots may be from the north, I feel that transplanting myself in Virginia has worked out just fine! I feel much more at home here in Virginia than I ever did in Connecticut.

So! History aside, the reason why I wanted to go to Bull Run today was due to my burning desire to try my hand at foraging. I only just started, and I my wild edible plant knowledge is not that vast yet. I know what blackberries look like, of course, and I know what daisies, oak trees, maple trees, and poison ivy look like. But I want to be able to eat what I find without possibly poisoning myself.

I have recently started reading: 20170613_150902

It’s very informative about what plant it is, where to find it, what parts of the plant are edible and when to harvest it, any warnings that may caution a novice forager from assuming that something is safe to consume.

Because I am so new at this–green as grass (pun intended)–I did not attempt to pick anything. I simply took pictures of plants that I wanted to research more. Does anyone know what these are?

Also, as a budding naturalist, I am making a home study of essential oils. I started the process with my spearmint last week, and this week I’ve added cinnamon and star anise to the list. I’m using the cold infusion method, where you simply add your plant parts to a sealable jar with the oil of your choice, tighten the lid, and wait two months while it does its thing.

I dried the mint leaves first before I mixed them with oil. I used olive oil as the base. There are other oils you can use (coconut, almond, jojoba), but olive oil is readily available, inexpensive, and less likely to give someone a bad reaction; I have friends and family that are allergic to nuts, wheat, and other potential allergens and it has made me sensitive to their plight.

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I’ve already bought the dark bottles to store the oils in once the oil is thoroughly infused. Now, all there is to do is wait. For two months. Patience. OOOOOOOOMMMMMM……

So that’s all that’s exciting in my life for the present!

Oh, on a side note pertaining to star anise, I’ve added it to my coffee temporarily to help alleviate menstrual cramps. And it works! And it’s a hell of a lot healthier than taking Ibuprofen every 4 hours! Just thought I would share, in case there are any ladies out there who could use a remedy.

If coffee is not your thing, try chai or chamomile tea. Chai has anise in it, along with cardamom, cinnamon, and cloves–all amazing for your health! Chamomile helps to reduce pain as well but it is not always suited for people with certain conditions. If you’re pregnant, it’s not advisable to drink chamomile. If you have allergies to certain plants like ragweed, don’t drink it. Also, certain medications may react chemically with the compounds in the tea. I am not a doctor, so please ask for medical advice from a professional before taking my advice.

Stay cool, my friends! Until next time!

3 thoughts on “The Blue, the Grey, and a Newbie’s Search for Wild, Edible Greens

  1. Pingback: The Blue, the Grey, and a Newbie’s Search for Wild, Edible Greens | A Green-Ish Thumb

  2. I too have an interest in wild edibles and was amazed at how many I found growing in my own back yard – what we often misguidedly call weeds and ignore. Looking at what I found here in the South of Tasmania they were all European migrants brought here by the early settlers as cottage garden plants for food and medicine!

    Liked by 1 person

    • We have some non-indigenous plants here too. Everyone is crazy about uprooting as much garlic mustard as possible it’s native to Asia, and kind of spreads like bamboo. It was brought over to help prevent erosion, but it’s doing more harm than good now, apparently. Thanks for following, by the way!

      Liked by 1 person

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